Archive for Richard Bandler

NLP Can you model this? NLP Training?

Posted in 1, NLP Training with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 22, 2009 by nlpwithed

A question for all NLP trainers – can you teach modelling?
Can you generate new NLP models? Can you give me an education in Modelling Behaviour through NLP?

Go on Youtube and contrast the answers of Richard Bandler and John Grinder ” What is NLP?” What a difference. Richard is a natural modeller, someone who can recover vital information quickly from a modelling subject.

You will notice John Grinder makes the clear distinction between Modelling and applications of modelling. So for instance theres modelling the Meta model and theres using the meta model. Two very different skills.

So if your thinking of going on a Master Practitioner Training – test the trainer out.

Can you show me a model you have created? Then test the model out – see how well it works.

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In Reality, This is Real – now lets Change it!

Posted in 1, NLP Language, NLP Patterns & Techniques with tags , , , , , , , , , , on December 15, 2009 by nlpwithed

In working with clients and seeing people with a variety of issues, one thing that has changed in recent years is treating the client’s presenting problem as real. This was pioneered in the 70s by Virginia Satir (Family Therapist) then by Richard Bandler (NLP originator). They treated the literal meaning of what was said by the client as a true statement of affairs. Of course going back before then and even now with some of the current medical thinking, “the pull yourself together school of thinking” does not get anywhere, its destructive and simply invalidates the poor sufferer.

So in using energy therapies we can listen and pay attention to our clients really carefully. We treat the issue/problem as real as a broken leg or ruptured Achilles.
In presenting as a therapist we can set ourselves up usefully as to how we interact with the client. Right from the off our attention should be on them, every piece of information contains the clues not just what the problem is but how it might have been formed. For example, if someone appears clumsy in coming into the clinic, they may not have a strong association with own physicality, their body and the connection to self. How do they maintain that level of separation?

I was working with an athlete who had seen her times drop over recent months.
When we traced the issue we noticed he legs literally felt heavier even though she had not put weight on. Her voice even went heavier as she explained the problem as she slumped back. So we decided to work on the heaviness. We let the heaviness flow out through her feet which interestingly improved her balance and priopreception. We then added lightness to her legs by a variety of techniques including Emotrance. I guess many solutions from a sports psychologist would have involved training regimes, resting, nutrition, goal setting, visualising etc.

So here are types of description of what makes issues real for each client:-

• Physically (e.g. my back hurts)
• Symptomatically (e.g. sore shins)
• Metaphorically “This feels like a nail sticking in my knee”
• Phantom pain (pain in a removed leg)
• Emotionally (Energetically) “ I am feeling angry that I have not got a job”
• Psychologically (Beliefs, values, convictions) “ People just seem to walk all over me”
• Identity (What is says or means about them) “! am a stupid idiot”
• It is also possible that the issue can be multi-faceted; we can have an emotional, metaphorical, identity presenting problem. “I am pig sick of being stuck in this house with my daughter”

It’s useful to know what really the client is presenting. What is the level of the issue?
An identity related issue is very different to a physical one.

Pay attention to the language, gestures, expressions, breathing of course, movements, physical disposition, facial muscle tonus, voice tone and tempo in explaining the problem. If you want an example of a sharp change look at Tony Blair at the press conference following the death of scientist David Kelly, he looks a different person, even if you just look into the eyes. Instead of the Tesco Slogan “Every little helps”, “Every piece of information helps”.

When we sometimes see a euphoric response post Emotrance session, it’s clear what’s happened. So we can calibrate the clients state incoming and then calibrate outgoing, it’s a measure of our work! The athlete can measure their times in racing, we can measure a difference post Emotrance!

Modelling Richard Bandler 2

Posted in Ed Grimshaw, Hypnosis, Modelling Modelling, NLP Modeling, NLP Modelling, Richard Bandler with tags , , , , , on December 14, 2009 by nlpwithed

So what else was present in Richards modelling on that day

1) He paid close attention (acuity) towards the gestures of the subject.Evidenced in the feedback and reference to it.

2) All information provided was useful in terms of modelling and noticing patterns, not just the immediate skill set that is being modelled.

3) Richard was switched on to patterns in terms of the structure oh how Bobby Davro presented about what he really wanted to do with his life.

4) Richard switched into the level of congruence of the subject, notice for meaning and what matters. Richard makes connections between the language used and physiology.

5) Richard not caught up in personal content of Bobby but more around the structure and patterns

6) Fast distillation of modelling content. Rapid output from Richard with the minimum amount of detail to support but valid evidence nonetheless.

7) Richard working within the modelled subject and I would hypothesize alongside the subject

Modelling Richard Bandler

Posted in Ed Grimshaw, Modelling Modelling, nlp, NLP News, NLP Stories, NLP Training with tags , , , , , , , , , on December 13, 2009 by nlpwithed

About 9 years ago on a NLP modelling course near Tottenham Court Road in London. Richard Bandler, Paul Mckenna et all presented a NLP course on modelling. A lot of it was standard NLP however at one stage there was some modelling of Bobby Davro the comedian. McKenna and Breen were supposedly doing the official modelling and nothing remarkable was detailled by them.

However the next day Richard Bandler came on stage and gave a full download of what he had noticed. I wont give all the details here but one key point was that Richard had subjectively taken the position of Davro the previous evening. Davro had talked about the audiences perspective, Richard had followed him and paced each move. He had tested what was true for him in detail. It is technique for shortcutting to quick information about a subject. Matching position and physiology.

Putting NLP into the NLP Technique

Posted in NLP Hypnosis, NLP Modelling, NLP News, NLP Patterns & Techniques, NLP Reviews, NLP Talk, NLP Training with tags , , , , , , , on February 26, 2009 by nlpwithed

Take any NLP technique, and you have a sequence of instructions in a set order. For me NLP is much more than this, knowing that fixed technique is not enough, whether it be Change Personal History technique or the Fast phobia Cure technique. It is not about religiously sticking to a fixed protocol, it is more about understanding the client. Knowing the structure of the issue or problem, and then working to solve it calibrating from the feedback from their own responses.

Richard Bandler when training rarely repeats an NLP technique the same way twice. Richard will repeat it many times adding in variation, as well as much more of an intervention with a variety of other tools. So when we understand the NLP tools themselves, we can begin to formulate our own NLP techniques.

Every personal strategy that may be negative in one context can have a positive use in another arena. Take a compulsive shopper and apply the compulsion to say to keeping an office tidy or getting the ironing done. . Or you could just procrastinate. Instead of going out shopping, imagine all the hard work, the traffic, the queues, possibly having to take back a badly fitting pair of shoes. And then only to find you could have bought them £20 cheaper on a different side of town. One aspect of NLP is knowing what is useful for what and creatively applying a strategy to fit the best purpose.

Of course, you can only test whether a strategy is being replaced by applying to a real situation. . So if you still feel attracted to shopping for the shoes, .something else needs to change. . Once again, NLP submodalities is an excellent tool in creating a change. Which key submodality means you go to the shoes rather than staying at home. At one time going shopping is just a pain in the backside, now it seems a whole entertainment industry.

There are those people who run a meta programme, who just can’t have enough things and enjoy the activity of hunting for those things. We haven’t made the evolutionary step from hunting for our food and leaving hunting behind.

So to some extent, NLP is concerned with making a personal evolutionary step, so what kind of change, would you like to make?

In Your Face NLP VS Natural NLP

Posted in Ed Grimshaw, NLP Talk, NLP Training with tags , , , , , , on February 23, 2009 by nlpwithed

The other day and my friend asked me a question about NLP. He was concerned that a lot of practitioners or people who had trained at the practitioner training were very crude in their application of the material.

He said he had experience of the meta monsters and an “in your face” style of NLP people wanting to show off just how much they knew. He said this had put him off attending a training and did I know whether it was possible to train and practice NLP without a sense of arrogance.

I thought about this and wondered why it was so common for the feedback from non-NLPrs to have this experience.

I think there are a number of reasons; firstly some of the patterns are made explicit by the trainer out during the training, by utilising volume and inflection and also operating with an attitude. Secondly a good deal of NLP training uses power metaphors, these are sometimes translated as power over others rather than power over oneself. Thirdly some of the training is contextualised within the training room itself rather than some other natural applications beyond the training itself.

Some NLP students access state changes during the training that connect to the other material learned on the course.

I would contrast to that of the two cells of training is in-your-face NLP and naturalistic NLP.

In-your-face NLP

Natural NLP

Challenging style Pacing the other persons model of the world
Going for the position of domination and impact Going for affiliation and effectiveness
Demonstrates information rather than knowledge Deeper understanding
Dictating Communication
Crude Complexity applied simply
Sorting by self rather than the other person Neutral sorting preferences
Power over others Power through oneself
Ill fitting with the environment Best fit NLP tools to the circumstances
Fragmented knowledge Integrated with one’s own naturalistic patterns
   

The question therefore arises how can a training be designed so it is more likely to produce and naturalistic style of NLP rather than that of it being in-your-face.

Firstly there is no substitute for a thorough knowledge of the material and extensive practice. Recently there has been a fashion to reduce the number of training hours and the training requirements which means although NLP has become mainstream, the overall standard has fallen, due to numbers and lack of “flying time” .

Another key requirement would be to integrate any of the NLP patterns into the practitioner’s everyday environment.

The use of metaphors adopted by the training organisations likely to attract or repel certain people, the power metaphor certainly does not help. It seems strange that a field that has been developed to improve individual’s communication skills sometimes produces the opposite and simply delivers someone even more irritating than they were before.

One area of NLP that should enhance the communication between practitioner and client, or practitioner and public is the rapport model. Some trainers seem to teach this mechanistically rather than starting with the principles that underpin it. So if the practitioner is barking repeatedly at someone else is hardly surprising they failed to communicate unless they are dealing with an angry German Shepherd, and even then.

So we should have some fun when we are training but not just at other’s expense.

Curiosity and experimentation are key aspects to the attitude that goes with the good practitioner.

As Richard Bandler always says,” you go first” which means the practitioner applies the material to himself.